Posted on January 28th, 2014 by wombwithaviewblog.com

There’s been so much hype surrounding 3D/4D ultrasound and I have posted on this before but it’s been a while so it’s worth revisiting!

Your regular ultrasound is 2D, that is to say it is 2-dimensional so we only see two planes at a time.  Our regular vision is 3-dimensional so that we perceive depth.  Therefore, the ultrasound image is like looking at a flat piece of paper.  It carves out a 2mm slice thickness and we see whatever is in that plane.  We move the probe around in order to make a mental 3D picture in the sonographers’ mind so that we know how your baby is positioned and where to find all the parts.  It’s as complicated as it sounds!

We usually say the best time for a 3D scan is when you are about 27-28wks.  Yes, it’s possible to do it later but the farther along you are the more engaged the head gets, the less room baby has and the harder it can be to see..ergo, we may not be able to get good images.

What we need for a good image…

Baby needs to be looking up or even a little to one side with a great pocket of fluid in front of the face, no cord, limbs or placenta in the way!  If all these things are so, we can get AMAZING images!  If not, we can’t.  It’s kinda all or nothing.  Sometimes we can get a partial face shot but those are not always great.  See the image below:

SONY DSC

 

Compare to the much better 3D image below.  Huge difference!

SONY DSC

To further clarify, 3D is a frozen image, 4D is seeing baby move in 3D…yawning, sticking out the tongue, opening his/her eyes (which freaks some people out but I think it’s cool, of course).  So if baby is active, we can record these video clips.  We typically save all images and clips to a DVD for you to take home.

Be sure to ask your doctor about the policies regarding these exams at his/her office, especially regarding what time-frame they want you to schedule and their policy if baby is not cooperating.

More here regarding elective 3D non-medical ultrasound businesses!

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