Posted on July 27th, 2017 by wombwithaviewblog.com

Consulting Dr. Google About Your Abnormal Fetal Ultrasound

Don’t do it, Moms-to-be! As much as you may be tempted, I have to caution you to not web-surf regarding your abnormal fetal ultrasound. Here’s why…

Because you surf the net for these details, you end up finding an entire spectrum of possibilities ranging from normal to severely abnormal fetal findings. And most of them may not apply to your circumstances at all. The result is usually the same. Your imagination runs away with you, and you start to worry that everything you’re reading applies to you and your baby. I always know a mom has been consulting Dr. Google when I get questions like “Is my baby’s bladder inside its body??” My response is usually the same…I reassure her with an “It sure is!” Then with a little smile, I advise “Quit looking up stuff on the internet!” Moms’ responses are usually the same, too. “I know, I know…I just can’t help myself!”

In this day and age of anything we want to know at our fingertips, it is nearly impossible to NOT research something that piques our curiosity. So, naturally, when you get your ultrasound results from your doctor, and he mentions you have a lot of amniotic fluid (polyhydramnios) or your baby has cysts on its brain (choroid plexus cysts), you freak out a little (or a lot). It’s completely understandable! But these findings may VERY WELL not be a reason to panic!

If Your Doc Wants to Refer You

Sometimes, we sonographers (even the experienced ones) detect things we just can’t explain. This doesn’t mean something detrimental to your baby; it just means we can’t fully explain it. We know this is disconcerting to an expectant parent(s). Usually, if something requires the attention of a high-risk specialist (aka a perinatologist or MFM or Maternal Fetal Medicine), your doctor will tell you when he discusses your ultrasound results. In such a particular case, he/she will usually express that something noted on the examination stands out as abnormal (or possibly a normal variant – something that’s a little different but considered normal), and he would like a second opinion.

In my experience, if your provider feels it is not grossly worrisome, he/she will say so. Your doctor will then refer you to MFM so they can do a more extensive Level 2 ultrasound. The perinatologist should discuss this ultrasound with you, provide an opinion on the issue, and the severity of the problem. MFM will also let you know if they feel there really is no problem.

If Your Report is Normal

If you are not referred to a perinatologist, then it’s very likely that nothing worrisome enough was seen on your ultrasound. Your doctor will also let you know that your ultrasound was negative or unremarkable. At times, we can’t see something well because of Baby’s position or other factors. Usually, it’s something like Baby’s heart or spine. In these cases, your doc may want to look again to ensure a normal appearance. There are many minor findings that we may note on a regular sonogram which may not be alarming to your doctor. Mostly, they just require a follow-up later to see if the issue is resolved. They mostly turn out to be insignificant, especially if no other abnormalities are seen with your baby. In other words…they are likely not a big deal!!!

So don’t make yourself worry! Don’t ask Dr. Google, ask your doctor instead. Make a list of all your questions, and he/she will let you know if other tests are needed. I know it’s tempting, but this is only the beginning of all the things that drive us crazy as moms! Save your sanity for when your kid is a driving teenager!

 

As always, thanks for reading! Please feel free to email with any questions or comments at wombviewerblog@gmail.com.

 

Whether you are worried about an abnormal fetal ultrasound or not, subscribe to get reliable ultrasound information delivered straight to your inbox.

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Posted on August 8th, 2014 by wombwithaviewblog.com

When a patient told me today she worried about her follow-up ultrasound scan for an entire month I knew I needed to address this issue.

This scan was ordered by her doctor 4 wks after her anatomy screening ultrasound and the patient thought something was wrong with her baby.  When she revealed this, I tried to ease her anxiety by explaining the protocol of these examinations.  On the anatomy screen we have a whole checklist of maternal and fetal anatomy to measure and document.  When parts on our list are limited, and oftentimes they are, most doctors will typically bring the patient back a month or so later for a second attempt to complete the checklist.  Adequate visualization of all these structures relies on so many variables, especially fetal position.  Most of you already know that if Baby is facing your back, we just can’t obtain that portrait for which you’ve been so desperately waiting.  It also means we can’t document all the facial structures we’d  like to see.  Another example is when Baby is lying on her back; in this position, we cannot evaluate the spine adequately.

Limited visualization is very different from questioning an abnormality.  When this happens, your doctor discusses the problem in question at your very next visit, answers any questions you have and refers you to a Perinatologist, a high-risk OB doc, for an evaluation of the suspected problem and recommendation for treatment.  Every doctor manages their patients a little differently, but this is how our docs handle this issue in our practice. There are many things we see on a regular basis that are quite minor that we follow-up and manage ourselves but your doctor knows when you need a high-risk assessment.

So, if you’ve gone in for your anatomy screen recently and you didn’t get to see this:

SONY DSC

Don’t panic!

Maybe Sweet Pea will let you see his great profile next time:)

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Posted on July 13th, 2014 by wombwithaviewblog.com

This post calls out to all the expectant moms looking for early gender ultrasounds from elective 3D ultrasound, privately-owned, non-medical businesses. Regardless of what they advertise, please read this first before scheduling your visit! Moms, just do your homework. You have a right to know before you go!

3D ultrasound fetal face 33wks

Just look at this shot! It’s so precious, isn’t it? Who couldn’t fall in love with their little one more and more with every great sweep of the probe? Heck, I fall in love with your baby with every image like this that I take!

We, in OB/GYN healthcare, understand expectant parents’ desire for images like this, but the safety of you and your baby is the greatest concern for all of us in the field. And there are a few important factors to take into consideration before having your scan performed by a non-medical facility. As a non-medical facility, they are not required to meet the same standards as your doctor’s office.

Why I Cannot Endorse Elective 3D Ultrasound Non-Medical Businesses

Uneducated Staff

The biggest issue I have with these business is something that may surprise you. They are not required to employ certified staff. Anyone can buy a machine, start a business, and charge you to scan your baby, but they don’t have to be a formally-educated or certified sonographer themselves or hire them. Scary, isn’t it??

Some years back, I was mailed a flyer from an elective 3D ultrasound business. The goal? To sell you your own entertainment ultrasound business by offering a franchise and ultrasound education in a matter of days…for anyone off the street with no prior ultrasound knowledge or training. Before this, I had no idea such a business was even legal.

As a certified OB sonographer for 25 years, I can vouch for the level of knowledge and skill we learn initially and acquire over time, through clinical experience and performing diagnostic examinations. Most importantly, our education and experience also applies to the equipment we use to scan you. Anyone performing OB ultrasound should be utilizing the ALARA principle – and any formally-educated sonographer knows what this is. Basically, we learn how to optimize power settings in order to use the lowest level needed to obtain a good image. This is recommended by the medical community because long-term effects of ultrasound are still being researched. Someone who is not formally-trained likely has no knowledge of how to do this or even know it exists.

Ask about RDMS credentials (or DMS, meaning they have recently graduated).

Equipment Maintenance and Safety

They are not required to maintain safety standards for their equipment. Machines need maintenance to ensure they are performing properly and safely. Cracked probes and cords that are worn, old, and/or not properly cleaned or maintained can be an electrical hazard to their customers. Maintenance is costly, and I just have to wonder how many of these businesses elect to bypass it because they can. You may not necessarily know whether their equipement is safe.

No Physician on Site

Though not a diagnostic exam, a physician is not on site in case a problem is detected. And detecting an obvious problem is much less likely for someone not formally trained.

Unrealistic Promises

Now, let’s address fetal sex. After all, most of you who are super anxious to find out if you can shop for pink or blue want to know as early as possible! Most of these places advertise 100% accuracy of fetal sex guesses from 12 or 14 Weeks. This is irresponsible and something they actually cannot do. They can’t guarantee a gender guess is 100% accurate. They can only guarantee you a refund if they’re wrong. I’m sure you many of you wouldn’t consider handing over your money if you knew this is what they meant by their “guarantee.”

A guess too early in pregnancy is a toss-up. You are paying good money, and in some cases, a lot of it. How qualified is the guess if the person scanning you isn’t certified with a level of OB ultrasound experience? Furthermore, any obstetrician or radiologist will tell you that no ultrasound can be considered 100% accurate. As a matter of fact, even DNA blood tests for first-trimester genetics or amniocentesis cannot boast of 100% accuracy – these tests are 99+% accurate. Ultrasound cannot come close to this in the first trimester.

My advice to a mom- or family-to-be is to keep an open mind regarding a sex guess too early and to wait for your anatomy screen before investing in paint!

They Do Not Perform a Diagnostic Exam

But sometimes they say or advertise that they do. Some of them even call themselves a diagnostic imaging center. They’ll tell you that they’ll scan a little to make sure Baby is okay. I believe this gives the expectant parent a false sense of security. No sonographer can legally tell you your baby appears normal by ultrasound.

Please be aware that no one can call an elective ultrasound scan “diagnostic” in any way! Your healthcare professional must order a diagnostic exam. You must be scanned by a certified sonographer in a medical facility where at least one physician is on site. Finally, an official report must be generated for a physician’s interpretation and signature.

No one scanning in an elective ultrasound business can promise a diagnostic test!

Undisclosed Information

Finally, they don’t have to advertise any of the above! They have no requirements to inform you of any of the issues above. If you ask, they have to answer honestly. So, be sure to ask!

 

A Message To Those Who Are Not Qualified to Scan!!!

Make no mistake about it. Waiver or not, if you scan a pregnant woman for fun and miss gross pathology, you can still be the subject of a law suit. Contrarily, how would you handle seeing something you feel is abnormal or you cannot explain? If you cannot call yourself a formally-educated sonograper, you have no business picking up a probe. You will miss pathology. And most of us who practice OB every day only get slightly better at breaking terrible news. This unfortunate experience will inevitably be yours at some point.

Moreover, I must also add here that a bit of artistry, (again) proper training, and experience makes for good 2D images – also needed in order to create good 3D images. Providing sub-standard images takes advantage of the customer paying for it, especially when they assume you know what you are doing. Anyone can set up a 60″ monitor and some comfy seating. Anyone can show you how to press a few buttons, but it in no ways means you can call yourself a sonographer. Also, it doesn’t mean you are providing a fair service for the money or doing it well.

 

Please Do Your Research on 3D Ultrasound Non-Medical Businesses!

Know before you go, ladies! Call in advance to ask if the person scanning you is a certified sonographer with OB experience and not a former used-car salesman. If not, you would be better off with this elective scan at your doctor’s office instead. A sonographer there is far more likely to detect an obvious problem. And your doctor or another physician would be in-house to discuss it with you and answer your questions.

I’ve made it no secret in my past posts that I’m not a fan of these cash cows. I believe that non-medical personnel should not be scanning pregnant women or utilizing medical equipment.

For the safety of the expectant parent, ACOG, ACR, and AIUM do not recommend elective scans at these sites. 

These businesses were borne of the expectant parents’ desire to see their baby at will, to bond with their baby, and to share with their families a special event. We understand this movie theater experience isn’t something you can receive at your doctor’s office, but the first and foremost concern is the health of you and your baby. I think any expectant mom would agree.

Even though this can be a fun experience for the family, the potential for serious issues is real. We can’t tell you not to go, but please do your homework first! If nothing else, ensure the person scanning you is qualified to do so! Educate yourself, and make an informed decision. Giving these places your hard-earned cash may not be worth your while.

Best wishes for happy and healthy!

Email me with your questions and comments at wombviewerblog@gmail.com!

For your most reliable ultrasound information, subscribe here.

 

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Posted on July 1st, 2014 by wombwithaviewblog.com

I’d like to share an email sent by a very worried mom-to-be and my response. I’m hoping my advice will help other moms who are concerned about results.

anxious mama:  I’m writing to you because I find your blog really interesting especially now when I’m pregnant. This whole world of pregnancy-connected things is quite overwhelming to me. I am now 25 weeks pregnant. And although I’m quite a rational person, sometimes I freak out.

Actually, I have some doubts as to my ultrasound scanning. During my 22nd Week, I had a prenatal ultrasound scan. The doctor checked everything, and everything seemed perfect except my son’s feet. He described them to be “strange” and suggested that those are sandal gaps. I was even more scared when he advised me to do an amniocentesis which I didn’t do. Now, I know that such feet can suggest DS, but my husband says that probably our son has such strange little toes because my toes are not “normal,” either.
Anyway, do you think you could take a look at some pictures of my child’s feet? I keep thinking that maybe the moment for the scan wasn’t right, or he was moving his toes, or anything…
If you agree to look at these photos, I will send them immediately 🙂

wwavb:  Thank you for reading my blog, and I hope it’s answered some questions for you. And, yes, while pregnancy is very much an exciting time in a family’s life, it can also come with a variety of worries and concerns.

Firstly, I have to tell you that I am not a physician, and I cannot in any way confirm whether your baby has sandal gap toes. Even if I saw your images, I did not scan you live or real-time and did not observe your scan, so I could never diagnose something by a single frozen image.
My best advice is this. If this is a concern you now have and it is one that causes you to lose sleep and if it is also an answer you feel you must now have, talk to your doctor. He is truly the only person who can provide you with an answer. Sometimes, if there are no other abnormal findings, this can just be a normal variant meaning your baby is otherwise normal. However, your doctor offered you an amnio because only an amnio can tell you for sure. This is your doctor’s purpose…to manage your pregnancy and to help you navigate through such concerns.
I’ve assisted on hundreds of amnios in the past, and it is usually a pretty quick test with a little stick of a needle and a mild cramp. Talk to your doc about all the pros and cons, and let him know if you are reconsidering.
I hope I’ve helped to some degree, and I hope you’ll subscribe to receive future posts! I wish you all the best for a beautiful and healthy baby:)
wwavblogger
***
My reader never sent me her images, but as I stated in the email, it’s something only her doctor can confirm for her. I do know pregnancy can be a scary time. It’s always fun when everything is normal, and everyone wants a healthy baby. But in those times when health is questioned, and especially when it is a reality, rely on your doctor to help you through it.
Our babies come to us for all sorts of reasons that we can’t know about now or understand. Sometimes it’s all in the big plan of life that we are chosen to care for those very special children who need very special parents. It’s not the end of your world, it’s the beginning of theirs and your life together!
Many blessings to all mamas and babies out there!

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Posted on June 29th, 2014 by wombwithaviewblog.com

Not so much. Not when it comes to pregnancy and we see it every week. A patient is given ultrasound results by her doctor, she goes home to Google the information and then calls back to the office in a complete panic over what she’s read. This is a big mistake! The internet is filled with more information than we need and than what applies to you in your pregnancy. You are likely causing yourself more heartache and worry than is necessary.

What you find when consulting Dr. Google is the whole spectrum of findings and worse-case scenarios. This is also the case on most every blog and site, no matter credible. You also get forums of patients with no medical background discussing their results with quasi-knowledge and missing links.  At the end of the day, your doctor is your advocate for managing your pregnancy. Only she/he has your chart full of pertinent medical information. Only your doctor can advise you on what the next step can be or order further testing. Whatever the decision, discuss it with your obstetrician or other healthcare professional taking care of you and Baby.

Remember this. Dr. Google cannot advise you, console you, or discuss test results. This is why you have an obstetrician.

Moreover, Dr. Google will certainly not be the one to catch your precious bundle of joy on the day of delivery. Direct all your concerns to one who will be – that’s why she is in the baby business:)

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Posted on March 29th, 2014 by wombwithaviewblog.com

I thought this title was a very appropriate follow-up to yesterday’s post!  Not only is there sometimes a crowd in the uterus but also in the ultrasound examination room.  While this is an exciting time for the couple, it has become very much like a reunion where hoards of family show up for the occasion and actually expect to all pile into the room for the spectacle.  This is not okay.  You see, I LOVE the diagnostic, puzzle-piecing together of each examination.  The finding of pathology..how it presents..how I can learn from that.

Over the years, as ultrasound has become more commonplace as an important diagnostic tool for the obstetrician, so people in general come to have expectations about these visits.  It has always been and will always be, first, a medical examination.  I am looking for abnormalities in or around your baby.  Occasionally, I find them.  This is the goal of my job and the scope of the practice of ultrasound.  When this is your first baby or if you’ve never experienced a fetal abnormality in the past, patients seem to be oblivious to the possibility of such findings.

If you bring your parents, grandparents, in-laws, siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, and all your nieces and nephews of all ages with carriers and strollers, expect to leave them outside.  Examination rooms are usually quite small and we need some quiet and concentration here.  We cannot focus on your baby and the task at hand with random loud chatter, jokes, and laughter from the peanut gallery; people breathing down our necks and talking in our ears; a multitude of fingers pointing at the monitor; twenty questions of “what is that dark space up there” (one of a hundred dark spaces and I’m expected to point to the monitor until I find the area in question); the ringing and text alerts of ten cell phones and family carrying on their own conversations about everything from what they saw on TV last night to neighborhood gossip to what everyone wants for dinner. This is exactly what happens when so many are present…distracting, to say the least. But we know they are simply there for the fun and excitement of having a new baby in the family. We understand this which is why we do business first and party later.

So, typically, I will take the patient and one person back first. Do the important medical stuff. I love to point out parts of Baby as we go along (without the help of random family fingers on my monitor) and patients usually desire and appreciate this narration. When diagnostics are complete, I’ll allow family in and then do a once-over on Baby, pointing out all the cutesy parts I can find like little piggies, a cute profile and gender. This is usually all they want, anyway!

So, when it’s your turn for an ultrasound, bring your spouse and mom if you want but lie to everyone else. Tell them it isn’t allowed. They can see pictures later. It’s sometimes a pretty funny sight, though.  Once the exam is over, after being packed in there like sardines, I’ll open the door and all the family comes spilling out into the hallway like mimes or clowns pouring out of a VW bug.

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Posted on February 27th, 2014 by wombwithaviewblog.com

So, I wrote this post about two years ago as one of my firsts.  It’s worth addressing again.  Now that I have a few regular readers and since most of you are pregnant, it’s definitely worth repeating!

Basically, you have questions..some we (sonographers) can answer and some we just can’t!

***

Probably, the most frequent question I get asked is if everything looks okay, healthy, normal, etc.  Wow, if I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard this I could retire by now!!  Usually to the patient’s dismay, this is something NO SONOGRAPHER can ever tell you.  Firstly, not everything that is abnormal can be seen by ultrasound (some chromosomal abnormalities, for example).  No sonographer can ever say that a fetus has Down Syndrome simply by an ultrasound examination alone.  Yes, we look for red flags; occasionally, we see them; sometimes we don’t.  However, other tests have to be done to confirm such.  If you’ve ever been pregnant, you know there are a multitude of tests that your doctor will request at certain times in your pregnancy depending on what the two of you have discussed.

Secondly, only your physician, his/her nurse or doc on call in his/her absence has the legal right to give you these results.  Yes, it is my job to know what I am seeing and to know if something does not appear structurally normal.  That is the scope of my job..to find abnormalities and report them to your doctor.  I have to be able to answer his/her questions about what I am seeing, questioning or diagnosing and how other parts of your baby are functioning in light of the finding.  It’s a big piece of your pregnancy puzzle that helps your doctor determine how your pregnancy needs to be managed.

Regardless of whether it is something relatively insignificant that we see or seriously abnormal, it is NEVER our place to inform you of these findings.  Our job is to share this information or any suspicions with your doctor, your doctor examines the information and concludes whether he or she agrees with our findings and your doctor then shares his/her interpretation of the information with you along with what options he/she recommends next.

The reason it is done this way is because

a) sonographers are not physicians; your doctor went to school for many years to learn how to manage your pregnancy and care and

b) your doctor is the only person who is truly qualified to answer the plethora of ensuing questions when a problem IS suspected.

Finally, you have to remember that it is your physician with whom you have the personal relationship.  Your doctor cares for you and your unborn child and your doctor wants to be the person to break any news to you, console you and inform you.  Occasionally, I will have a persistent patient or spouse who will say, “Yeah, but you KNOW whether you see something really wrong or not.”  I’ll admit that I do but I always defer to the physician’s interpretation.  I know it is simply parent anxiety and a lack of understanding of proper medical protocol that drives the questions.  For the nervous patient, it does sometimes feel like an eternity waiting for results.  My usual response when a patient has asked this question is “Your doctor has to look at all of these images and he/she will discuss your ultrasound when you see him/her next.”

Only your doctor can advise you, calm your fears and reassure you about your pregnancy in a way that no one else can!

***

As always, feel free to ask me your questions!  If it pertains to the scope of my job, I’ll be happy to answer.  If it’s a question your doc needs to answer, you can be sure I’ll defer to your physician!

Happy pregnancies to you all 🙂

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Posted on February 20th, 2014 by wombwithaviewblog.com

This is a first trimester screening test for chromosomal abnormalities which I have performed for a couple of years now.  We have to have special certification in order to perform this examination.  I will not get into any serious depth regarding the subject because I am not a doctor, I am not YOUR doctor, this testing is quite complicated, and only your doctor can give you the most pertinent, accurate, and up-to-date information, as well as, answer all your questions on the subject! I literally am only scratching the surface here from an ultrasound standpoint.

Read on for this question from a reader regarding NT scans:

reader:  I just read about NT scans and how they can be a way to detect Down syndrome. My doctor never mentioned anything about this to me. Do you think it was done during my 12 week dating ultrasound? Or is this something that you need to specifically request? I’m 29 and have no family history so I’m not sure if that’s why it wasn’t offered. After my 12 week ultrasound she did offer other tests but she said I wasn’t high risk and we opted not to do them.  Thank you for your time!

wwavb:  I can chime in on this because I do the NT scan so I know a bit about them.  You answered your own question.  The tests that your doctor talked to you about may have included the NT scan, but you opted not to do them, so that’s why you didn’t have it.

The NT scan is an attempt at a measurement of the nuchal area along with a finger stick.  The measurement cannot always be obtained.  It is probably one of the most tedious examinations I do and this measurement can only be taken one way. There are a number of variables which depend mostly on fetal position that dictate this. If we can’t get the measurement, the test cannot be performed. The lab takes the measurement from the scan and some numerical values from your blood and personal history and puts that all into a formula.  The result determines your RISK or CHANCES for having a baby with four different chromosomal abnormalities – Down Syndrome is one.  This result does NOT tell you whether your baby has these abnormalities or not, only your risk for having a baby with this problem.  If it comes back elevated, you have to decide whether you want to proceed with other tests like amniocentesis which WILL determine if your baby has a particular one of these abnormalities.
For your greatest clarity, you should ask your doctor at your next visit if the NT is something she would have offered.  If you have a concern and would like to look into genetic testing, certainly discuss with your doctor what options she would recommend for you.  She is your best educator!!  
Hope that helped!
Here’s to your happy and healthy pregnancies!

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Posted on November 23rd, 2013 by wombwithaviewblog.com

This one is for sonographers.  I thought initially the patient could read it, also, to understand what it is she should expect from her sonographer.  However, I quickly realized this isn’t something the patient needs to read to understand..it’s something she already expects.  Every patient that walks into your room, regardless of how she reacts to you, EXPECTS to be greeted kindly and with a smile; EXPECTS to be explained in a fully understandable way what kind of examination she can expect to have performed and how it will be performed and whether it will be painful.  She expects conversation..and she deserves it.

Sonographers, you have GOT to get out of the mindset that your only job is to look at that monitor and say nothing else to your patient.  She is human, she has feelings.  Sometimes, she is even scared and anxious about the examination she is going to undergo.  Sometimes, she’s not afraid of the examination but fearful of results.  Sometimes, she’ll even tell you so.  YOU are a provider.  YOU are the master and conductor of the environment in your room at that moment.  You have to remember that the exam you are performing requires “invading” the personal space of another individual and actual contact with that person.  It IS a very personal experience for that patient and, often, a very uncomfortable one.  Your patients are trusting that you will do a good job for them because you are there representing, an extension of, her physician.

You can ask her how she’s feeling today.  If she says ‘Terrible’, you can lend apologies and say you hope her day will be better as soon as this test is over!  Patients often laugh as I’m gelling up the middle finger of a vinyl glove as I slide it down over the vaginal probe.  I always say ‘Gotta have a little comedy in medicine somewhere, right??!’  They’ll ask about your family, pictures, your kids, your experience in your career.  Talking to them during the exam helps most people to just get through it a little more easily.

Don’t be afraid to open a conversation for fear of being asked the question we all cannot answer regarding results.  The best way to respond to this is to simply state ‘Well, my job is to take these measurements and images.  Your doctor will want to examine them along with your other clinical information and then decide how your ultrasound fits into that picture.  Only your doctor has all the pieces of that puzzle!”

For OBs, you just about can’t get through an exam without mom or dad asking ‘Does everything look ok?’  I’ll usually say ‘So far, so good but, you know, your doctor will go over this entire exam with you and you can ask her any questions you have.’  Point out their baby’s parts as you take your images.  Thank the heavens for postprocessing!  You can always go back and focus on things that need special attention after your patient leaves.

On occasion, they’ll say ‘Yeah, but you know what you’re looking at.’  I’ll say ‘Yes, I have to know what I’m seeing to know which measurements to take but it’s your doctor who has to decide what it all means for you.’  Or otherwise explain that her doctor will get a report from the radiologist.  And be knowledgeable regarding how long they’ll have to wait to receive results.  You can bet the farm you’ll get THIS question.

One thing I’ve realized over the years, and anyone who works with the general public would agree, that you can’t make everyone happy all the time.  It’s just impossible.  Some people can’t be made happy.  But when you go out of your way to make conversation with your patient, make her feel comfortable, answer her questions and show her how cute and fat her baby’s cheeks are, it (most of the time) makes for a happier patient.

It feels good to get a warm ‘Thank you’ as you walk your patient out.  If you can send her out with a good chuckle, even better:)

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Posted on February 23rd, 2013 by wombwithaviewblog.com

At 11 Weeks pregnant, take a look at what you should expect to see by ultrasound!

 

11 Weeks pregnant

11 Weeks pregnant

So a little more time has passed and we are now about 11wks!  Babies are slightly bigger = about 4.3cm now or almost two inches!  The second trimester starts at 14 Weeks, so the first trimester, thought of as the most crucial one for growth and development, is nearly over.  Babies can be seen doing a lot of quick jerky movements at this point.  They can be quite active and actually mimic little jumping beans in there!  In the second image, you can see little legs quite distinctly.

Until next time!

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