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Placental Location

Is Placental Location Important?

You bet. We always evaluate placental location in the 2nd Trimester. We need to ensure your placenta is not too close or covering the cervix, aka Baby’s exit. But is it important that you know where your placenta is positioned? Most of the time, your doctor will not discuss it with you unless its position is a problem.

Why Isn’t Placental Location Always Discussed?

Like so many other variables about your pregnancy, your doctor will consider this a strictly need-to-know basis. In other words, it just isn’t important if your placenta appears entirely unremarkable (appearing normal). You’re juggling SO much info as it is already, right? No sense in adding one more thing to the memory pile.

How Do We Describe Placental Location?

placental location

Check out my handy-dandy graphics!

The Anterior Placenta

An anterior placenta is one located on the front or belly side of the uterus. With the placenta in this position, your chances for a great profile in the 3rd Trimester can be a challenge! If you have an anterior placenta, you’ll see it at the top of your image, like this, outlined in white:

placental location, anterior placenta

The Posterior Placenta

A posterior placenta is located on the backside of your uterus. In this position, Baby has a nice pillow when lying on your back. This fetus has a nice little cushion for her little bottom here. You might see a placenta here on the bottom of your image, like so:

placental location, posterior placenta

The Fundal Placenta

A fundal placenta is located at the top of your uterus. We can also see any number of combos with respect to your placental position like fundal/posterior or fundal/anterior. The image below might be classified as fundal/anterior.

placental location, fundal/anterior placenta

The above images depict some very basics with respect to where your placenta decided to implant!

When Do You Need to Know?

Only if your placenta is very low or covering your cervix do you really need to know about it. Oftentimes, we’ll note a low placenta on your anatomy screen exam. This is not a big deal most of the time. About 9/10 exams where we see it a little low at this point in pregnancy, the placenta will “move” up on a follow-up exam a month or so later.

Wait, isn’t the placenta is attached to our uterine wall? Yep. So, it doesn’t actually “move” despite our calling it such. It’s more that as the uterus grows bigger, the placenta will move with the uterus and grow further away from the cervix . . . most of the time. Sometimes, our placenta can be as stubborn as our children!

If this is your case, don’t worry! There’s not a doggone thing anyone can do about it. It’s just one of life’s little curve balls, like parenting and so many other facets of this thing we call life that we just can’t control. We’ll continue to follow a low placenta until it’s out of the way or until your doc decides it’s there to stay. In these cases, C-Section will be the topic of conversation, but not until later in your pregnancy! Your healthcare provider will want to give the stubborn placenta every opportunity to get the heck out of the way!

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I hope this post helped you understand placental location a little better!
If so, feel free to comment below.

Got your own question or comment for me? Great!
You can email me here.

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Just subscribe here, and I’ll respond ASAP.

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As always, thank you for reading wombwithaviewblog.com!

Gender Determination–Is It Listed on My Report?

Gender Determination in an
Ultrasound Report?

I’ve received questions lately regarding where to find fetal sex or gender determination in an ultrasound report. Can you always find this information in a report?

The short answer? No, not always.

Actually, we mostly do not record fetal sex, and it’s mostly not important to your doc. Typically, fetal sex is not pertinent information to the examination. Though parents may desire it, physicians don’t need the gender determination to manage your care and that of your baby if both are healthy. The above is true for most general OB practitioners in the US. However, every physician practices a little differently, and one can certainly dictate if he or she wants this info on all patient reports (if possible to determine). The case may be different if you are seeing a high-risk OB doc, aka a perinatologist. Their reports consist of much greater detail and may possibly include a fetal sex/gender guess.

Example of a Blank Report

gender determination, ultrasound report
In the images of a sample report taken from a monitor, you’ll notice there is a whole host of blanks to fill, but fetal sex is not one of them. On the first page where you see Sex: Other, this refers to the patient. Patient demographics were not entered here, so the Sex option defaulted to Other. We always include your LMP or EDC/EDD – aka baby due date. The larger blue space would be filled with fetal measurements, estimates of gestational age, and fetal weight as they are obtained.

OB ultrasound report, gender determination, ultrasound report

OB ultrasound report, gender determination, ultrasound report
In the pages above, you’ll note the list of fetal organs and structures we attempt to document on a mid-pregnancy anatomy screen. We only fill out the section called BPP in the third trimester when your doc orders this particular examination. And the CVP is usually only filled out when performing a Fetal Echo or detailed heart examination.

Exception to the Gender Determination Rule

There always seems to be at least one exception to every rule. Because the responsibility of a sonographer is to search out structural malformations, we also have to report suspicions of abnormal external genitalia. In other circumstances, we may see particular abnormalities that we might group together, as in the case of certain syndromes. Sometimes, knowing fetal sex helps physicians either support or rule out a particular chromosomal or structural problem. Some of these are gender specific. In the pic below, we have a designated space on a Comments page to expound on our findings. We can add fetal sex here if we feel it is pertinent information to the findings.
OB ultrasound report, gender determination, ultrasound report
In some countries, fetal sex is neither reported nor discussed with parents due to the cultural preference of one sex over another. And some facilities are beginning to incorporate policies against providing parents with this news due to litigious reasons. Unfortunately, such is life in the good ol’ US. Facilities want to limit their liability for guessing incorrectly by simply not allowing their sonographers to guess at all.
So, if you don’t want to know your baby’s sex (or even if you do!), don’t expect your ultrasound report to disclose that information. Your sonographer creates the images and report. We only include what we need and leave out anything we don’t!
Best wishes for happy and healthy!

As always, you can email me with your comments and questions here.

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gender determination and ultrasound!

 

 

Male AND Female Gender Ultrasound Images

Male and Female Gender Ultrasound Pics!

Okay! So, this is a perfect example of how we can sometimes determine gender at less than 17 Weeks! The images below represent twins and their perfect images of male and female gender! It just doesn’t get better than this. You must remember, however, that not all boys and girls look exactly the same at every week of gestational age; so your baby may look a little different from what you see here. You can read more about why everyone’s images look different from one another here.

These babies dated at 16w4d and depict textbook images for boy and girl fetal sex. They make a perfect side-by-side comparison!

These were very easy potty shots. We’ve just gotta love it when not just one baby cooperates but two in the same belly. These babies hardly made me break a sweat. I’ve even labeled their parts for you. So, hopefully, they make for easy reading for you. Check them out below.

Baby girl, on the left, is showing off only her bottom. Imagine her feet pulled up over her head. Flexible little things, aren’t they?

male and female gender ultrasound, 16 Weeks pregnant

Female, left and Male, right – Twins, 16 Weeks

male and female gender ultrasound, 16 Weeks pregnant

Baby boy, on the right, is showing off his thighs and bottom.

Unfortunately, not all babies cooperate like these. Some babies don’t want to show off the goods, and there’s little we can do to make them move. I know we sure would have many more happy mamas out there if we could!

Want more great male and female gender ultrasound pics?

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As always, thanks for reading!

14 Weeks Gender–A Reader Asks Pink or Blue?

14-Weeks Gender & the Too-Early Guess

Read below for some props (thanks!) and a question about 14-Weeks gender from a new reader and subscriber:

First Email

reader:  Hi! I’m expecting my third little one in October. Before I ask my question, I just wanted to say that I’ve been reading your blog for the past three hours while my kids are down for a nap. I love it! I went for a private 3D ultrasound on Monday, and he said it was a girl! We are so excited because we have two little boys already. I’ve heard so many horror stories since I had it done, and I’m terrified he was wrong. I clearly see “three lines,” but I’m no ultrasound technologist. What do you think? Thanks in advance! I’ve already subscribed, and I’m excited for more!

14 Weeks pregnant, 14 Weeks gender, too-early gender guess

14 Weeks gender, 14 Weeks pregnant, too-early gender guess

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

wwavb:  Hi! First, let me say thanks so much for reading and subscribing. I’m so happy you are enjoying my (sometimes) sense of humor. I really am very honored that you spent three hours of your own personal quality time reading my stuff! Very cool.

So, I am going to guess that you are maybe 14 Weeks? 15? Please write back, and let me know. Maybe you have already come across some of my posts. You may also already be familiar with my opinion of these ultrasound drive-thrus! Baby looks a bit small in these images, like you may be a little early to determine gender.

If you are less than 18-20 Weeks, wait to paint! This is really the best time (and later) to determine gender, and those images are not proof enough to me to paint pink just yet. Please know I am not telling you he’s wrong, I just cannot concur based on these images.

Second Email

reader:  You’ve guessed correctly! I was 14 Weeks in this ultrasound and did, in fact, read your posts about the drive-thrus. I must say, if I’d had know your opinion before, I probably would’ve waited. He told me he was 75% sure it was a girl and to come back in two weeks for another look for free. I’m definitely not convinced that it is a girl, nor have I bought anything pink. I do hope that it is, though! Thanks for your input!

wwavb:  I hope so, too! Pink is so much fun to buy, and you could use some estrogen in your family! Feel free to email me again when you go back and then again when you go for your diagnostic anatomy screen at 18-20 Weeks. 😉 I’d love to tell you pink, too. Thanks again for reading.

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To anyone who is reading now or in the future, don’t let anyone take your money to guess gender at 14 Weeks. It truly is a guess, and anyone has a 50/50 shot without looking at all, right?! Please be sure to read my post above on non-medical, elective ultrasound businesses. It’s so important all moms are educated on the safety issues regarding some of them.

My best advice is to wait to buy pink or blue and wait to paint. Also, (by all means) ensure you have a real ultrasound professional scanning you.

 Have a great day!

Be sure to email your questions or stories to wombviewerblog@gmail.com!